National Geographic

National Geographic

@natgeo

Life is an adventure - enjoy the ride and the world through the eyes of National Geographic photographers.

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @FransLanting It’s always rush hour on the beaches of South Georgia Island. Extraordinary numbers of king penguins are going into the water to start fishing offshore. It’s a testimonial to the richness of this Southern Ocean ecosystem and the importance of this island at the edge of Antarctica as a sanctuary for marine life. Follow me @FransLanting to learn more about the amazing life history of king penguins on this spectacular island. @thephotosociety @natgeotravel @natgeocreative wildlifephotography nature naturelovers wild rushhour amazing

5 Hours ago

National Geographic

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Photo @tbfrost | This might look like a chicken embryo but it is in fact a saltwater crocodile embryo , photographed in the Northern Territory of Australia. I will post an adorable video by @melissalesh of Baby hatchling saltwater crocodiles in the wild on my profile @tbfrost. The reason that a chicken embryo and crocodile embryo look so similar is that crocodiles and birds are very closely related, both share a common ancestor: the archosaur. What is even cooler though is that scientists can see crocodiles have changed very little since the time of dinosaurs whereas birds have evolved considerably. Crocs really are the world's great survivors! For more photos and videos of crocodiles, follow @tbfrost. Photo made on assignment for National Geographic Society grant project on crocodiles.

8 Hours ago
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National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by @paulnicklen taken while onassignment with @cristinamittermeier, @ladzinski @andy_mann and @sea_legacy for @natgeo. A juvenile blue-eyed shag approaches me to inspect itself in my dome. No matter where I swam and no matter what I was trying to photograph, the curiosity of these young cormorants got the best of them. They poked, prodded and inspected every part of my dive gear. I fought back laughter and decided to quit running from them and grab a fun portrait. followme on @paulnicklen to see more from this icy dreamscape. gratitude nature beauty earthhour naturelovers

11 Hours ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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@stevewinterphoto @natgeo I am excited to bring my NG LIVE presentation, “On the Trail of Big Cats” to @natgeo’s Grosvenor Theater in Washington DC on April 13th! Please come to hear about my life and work with Jaguars, Snow Leopards, Cougars and Tigers!! Scarface succeeds after many days and gets his caiman!! We need to realize deep in our hearts that animals have emotions too. If we can treat them better - maybe we could find some empathy inside of us to treat each other better also. We need to fight for the right of jaguars to live - peacefully and without being killed for the traditional medicine market, and other trade. Help stop the demand for endangered species used in this practice! “When the buying stops, the killing can too” wildaid Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families, they feed themselves and their families in the same way we as humans used to! If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions, maybe we can treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not. The forests and grasslands of big cats give us 50% of our oxygen and 75% of fresh water. If we can save big cats we can help save ourselves! Join National Geographic's Big Cat Initiative, www.causeanuproar.org bigcatsforever Follow me @stevewinterphoto to other images and thanks! @stevewinterphoto @natgeo @nglive @natgeochannel @natgeowild @thephotosociety @natgeocreative fursforlife BCI bigcatsintiative startwith1thing @pantheracats @pantanalsafaris canonusa redcine @africanparksnetwork ldfoundation @leonardodicaprio @sanctuaryasia @bertiegregory

13 Hours ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by @thomaspeschak A shiver of scalloped hammerhead sharks swims off Darwin Island in the Galápagos. They are looking for cleaning stations where reef fish pick parasites and remove diseased skin (see white patches in this photograph) from these sharks. @saveourseasfoundation funded shark scientist Dr. Pelayo Salinas studies how water temperatures effects shark populations and has observed that after prolonged hot periods skin infections and parasite loads seem more prominent. On our warming planet this could result in further pressures on these already endangered sharks. Shot on assignment for @natgeo magazine for a forthcoming story on Climate Change and the Galápagos Islands. In collaboration with @darwinfound galapagosnationalpark and @ecuadortravel To gain further insights into the sharks of Galapagos please follow marine scientist @pelayosalinas

15 Hours ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Video: @andy_mann // An unfortunate mishap leads to ingenuity, and with one massive breath hold, a new way of collecting data is born. While working with biologist, Jorge Fontes, in Azores, we noticed a Mobula (Devil Ray) stuck to an anchor line and it sparked an idea. This is the first known deployment of a non-invasive, radio collar-tag to the species. In the past, tags are often speared into the Rays, arguably effecting their normal behavior and thus the data collected. The more we can learn about these beautiful rays the better the chances of protecting them. Field science is always an adventure! // followme @andy_mann for more videos on ocean science and our amazing blue planet @waittfoundation

17 Hours ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @michaelchristopherbrown. During one of several flights to Cuba these past couple years I was happy to have this partial view of Cayo Largo, a limestone island located off the south coast. Formed over millions of years from the remains of marine organisms, such as coral, forums and molluscs, Cayo Largo is known for its beaches, wildlife and scuba diving.

18 Hours ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @BrianSkerry. ‘Shark Lagoon’ - Blacktop Reef Sharks, Blue Travallies and Twinspot Snappers swirl within the pristene lagoon at Millennium Atoll, in the Southern Line Islands. Because of their remoteness, these islands and the waters surrounding them remain largely unspoiled, and diving the reefs here is like traveling back in time. Researchers studying coral ecosystems have discovered that a pristine reef has a biomass that is comprised largely of predators, including sharks, snapper and groupers. Sadly, many reef systems around the world today do not have these animals, as they have been fished to dangerously low levels. Every animal plays a vital role in the health of an ecosystem and when individual species are removed, the entire environment breaks down. A healthy ocean is needed for a vibrant planet. To see more underwater photography, and to learn more about oceanic conservation efforts, follow me on Instagram, @BrianSkerry. @thephotosociety @natgeocreatve @pristineseas southernlineislands southern line islands pristene seas national geographic underwater photography sharks shark reef coral coralreef photooftheday protect preserve conserve

20 Hours ago

National Geographic

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Phone photo by @gabrielegalimbertiphoto - Paris, France. Pont Neuf - A love padlock is a padlock which sweethearts lock to a bridge, fence, gate, or similar public fixture to symbolize their love. Most of the times sweethearts' names are inscribed on the padlock, and its key is thrown away to symbolize unbreakable love. In the past 15 years love locks have proliferated at an increasing number of locations worldwide. A couple of years ago, in France, authorities removed 45 tons of padlocks (close to one million locks) from Paris’s Pont des Arts. They say their weight was damaging the structure, and they replace them with plexiglass panels. Immediately after this Love locks began appearing in all the other bridges of Paris. Many tourists mistakenly believe this is a longstanding Parisian tradition, not realizing the practice only migrated into Paris in late 2008 after affecting cities in Italy and Asia. paris lovelocks love sweethearts padlock lovepadlock lovelock locks lock

22 Hours ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @CristinaMittermeier on assignment for @NatGeo // A silver stream flows through the belly of this massive iceberg. As a faint opalescent moon heralds twilight, we marvel on the intricate designs that the tides, the wind and the sea have carved on this piece of ice. I could tell you a thousand reasons why healthy ice in Antarctica is important but sometimes, you just have to marvel at the beauty of nature and be grateful that it still exists on our planet. Proud to shoot for @NatGeo, @NatGeoPristineSeas and @SeaLegacy, In the company of amazing shooters @PaulNicklen @Ladzinski @Andy_mann, @pattersonimages. * * * To see more images from this life-changing , please followme at @CristinaMittermeier. CCAMLR2018. MPA PhotographersforAntarctica ocean ice gratitude

1 Days ago

National Geographic

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Photo @ladzinski / A beautiful WeddellSeal resting on a polished granite shelf, an area where ice has receded. Over the last two decades the AntarcticaPeninsula region has warmed significantly, directly contributing to the loss of ice. Weddell seals live about 30 years and do not migrate, they are commonly known to spend their entire life within a few miles of their birthplace. Photographed onassignment for @natgeo / @sea_legacy @paulnicklen @cristinamittermeier @andy_mann @craigwelch @ianvaso @shanemoorefilms @pattersonimages

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Video by George Steinmetz @geosteinmetz Some 90% of the seafood consumed in the U.S. is imported, mostly in the form of farmed shrimp and salmon, and canned tuna. This video was taken yesterday at Guolian Aquatic, the biggest shrimp processer in China. They shell 20k tons of farmed shrimp per year, primarily for export to the U.S. and Europe, but that is starting to change. Rising incomes in China have allowed a shift in food habits to include more protein, and the domestic shrimp market is booming. onassignment for @natgeo To see the world's largest shrimp farm go to @geosteinmetz ... it will blow your mind!

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @amivitale. After a long hot morning exploring in the wilderness it's time for the elephants at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary ( @r.e.s.c.u.e) to have a mud bath, followed by a dusting. The mud is essential to keep them cool and potect them fom the Kenyan sun. It's also heaps of fun! Reteti is pat of the Namunyak Wildlife Consevancy in the Mathews Range of Nothen Kenya and was established in esponse to demands fom the local community, who ecognize wildlife as an oppotunity to impove livelihoods. Please follow all of us, @amivitale, @r.e.s.c.u.e and @sararacamp to support and learn more about these initiatives. @nrt_kenya @lewa_wildlife @ConservationOrg @tusk_org @kenyawildlifeservice @sandiegozoo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety elephants saveelephants retetielephants stoppoaching kenya northernkenya magicalkenya whyilovekenya africa everydayafrica natureisspeaking photojournalism amivitale

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by @thomaspeschak Namaqua Chameleons are endemic to the deserts of Southern Africa. In Namibia they hunt on both sand dunes and gravel plains, searching for beetles and other insects. Their modified tongues can accelerate from 0-60 mph in a hundredth of a seconds. Prey can be snagged in just 20 milliseconds. The white flakes around the animals head are old skin, which is shed regularly. Shot on assignment for @natgeo. For more photographs from Namibia follow @thomaspeschak

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by Michael Yamashita @yamashitaphoto - Spring has sprung in Sichuan province - a floating garden atop a submerged snag in the pristine waters of Panda Lake, Jiuzhaigou National Park. Jiuzhaigou is China's most popular Nationalpark well known for its turquoise hued waters. Sichuan China @natgeocreative @thephotosociety @natgeotravel

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Video by @Filipe_DeAndrade | By the end of this adventure we named this area “Natures Buffet.” I saw more predatory behavior in the saltwater marshes of South Carolina than any other environment I’ve filmed in. The dolphin activity was 100% going off. Everything from the ospreys, bald eagles, herons, pelicans and even us as the film crew benefited from the dolphins strand feeding. But even though the hunting was everywhere, that didn’t mean it was easy to film. That’s why it really took us sitting back and observing how this ecosystem works as a whole to be able to capture the dolphin’s predatory evolution. Check out the full hunt from my series WildUntamed on natgeowild.com/untamed or for click the link in my personal bio.

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Video by @joelsartore | An endangered Hispaniolan solenodon at Parque Zoológico Nacional in the Dominican Republic. This is one of the only venomous mammals on Earth. The second lower incisor tooth of this animal is grooved and can be used to deliver a venomous saliva. Hispaniolan solenodons have patches of skin full of apocrine glands on their thighs that are used to communicate with other individuals through scent. Like many species in the Dominican Republic, the most significant threat to this animal is the destruction of its habitat. To see an image of this solenodon, check out @joelSartore! . . solenodon venomous mammal video endangeredspecies photoark natgeo

1 Days ago

National Geographic

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Comb Ridge, Utah Video by @salvarezphoto (Stephen Alvarez) Rock art fascinates me. The images last thousands, sometimes tens of thousand of years. And even though we don't share the culture or even the language of the artist, the images still have power. This panel is carved into the sandstone of Comb Ridge in Southern Utah. It's part of the new Bears Ears National Monument. The Bears Ears contain over 100,000 archaeological sites. Th e landscape is central to the Dine, Hopi, Ute and Mountain Ute tribes. To see more of my work documentation the deep artistic history of the Bears Ears follow @salvarezphoto (Stephen Alvarez) as I work on a massive project documenting the deep history of art. BearsEars Utah

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by @simonnorfolkstudio Two Years ago this week the Yemeni crisis took a deadly turn. According to the United Nations, 16,200 people have been killed in Yemen since 2015 including 10,000 civilians. The humanitarian situation in what was already one of the world’s poorest nations, is now, after Syria, the most critical on the planet, with 20% of Yemenis severely food insecure. Sana'a, is a UNESCO World Heritage Site on account of its distinctive architectural character. The World Heritage Committee has also voiced concern over the damage inflicted to this great Islamic city. Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material. @instituteartist @michaelhoppengallery @benrubi_gallery @galleryluisotti @natgeo cityscape photojournalism islamicarchitecture islamic documentaryphotography simonnorfolkstudio simonnorfolk reportage Yemen Sanaa photojournalism journalism documentaryphotography UNESCO CivilWar war conflict arabianpeninsular arabia simonnorfolkstudio simonnorfolk worldheritage

1 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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photo by @daviddoubilet BFFs in a night sea. A juvenile jack is a hitchhiker seeking protective cover in the soft tentacles of a jellyfish in a deep channel off Moalboal Philippines. We were diving at night using a large suspended light array to attract creatures from the depths 3000 feet below. The shy jack and jelly pair appeared at the edge of light for a brief moment before turning back for the deep. The sea in the middle of the night is an alien universe, many creatures rising from the depths only under cover of darkness to feed. Drifting in the current in this dark world is like diving in a sea of stars. On @natgeo assignment inside the Coral Triangle, Philippines with @JenniferHayesig. ocean jellyfish bff dream night philippines coraltriangle for moreocean followme @daviddoubilet

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @christian_foto ( Christian Rodríguez ) A young girl of the ethnic group Hmong Black working at rice terraces. They seed rice together with several families of the "Lao Chai" village, Lao Cai province, Vietnam. Photo: @christian_foto / @prime_collective rice hmong vietnam

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @shonephoto (Robbie Shone) with words by @m_synnott (Mark Synnott) - Every sport has an unsung hero, some quiet badass that operates under the radar, pushing the boundaries of their chosen field of endeavor without giving a whit if anyone knows about it—or cares. Matt Oliphant, pictured here (unpublished photo), is just such an individual. Matt served as Robbie's photo assistant/rigger/schlepper/safety guy on the Dark Star assignment. And I'm embarrassed that we've made it this far down the road without calling out the massive contribution he made to the overall success of the project. When things got gnarly down in Dark Star, in other words, shortly after I stepped into the mouth of the cave, I turned to Matt and said, “Hey man, can you keep an eye on me, and make sure I get out of this cave alive?” Matt just chuckled and said, “You got it man.” Matt’s not one to boast, but over the course of three weeks we spent together in Uzbekistan, including at least one session sitting on a rock in base camp drinking scotch, he shared enough stories for me to wonder: who the heck is this guy? During one particularly harrowing tale, involving some horrendously deep cave in Mexico, I held up my hand for him to stop. “Wait a second,” I said. “Are you a famous caver?” “No, no, no,” replied Matt. “Nope, that’s not me.” Then he proceeded to rattle off a bunch of names of people that he considers to be the real icons of the sport. The thing is, I could swear I'd heard those same names in many of the stories Matt had been telling me. If you're a caver, you probably already know about Matt. If you're not, let me introduce you to my hero. And, in case you’re wondering: no, I won't be going underground again unless Matt is by my side. soulbrother darkstar myhero

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @amivitale. Mealtime for the elephants at Reteti Elephant Sanctuary ( @r.e.s.c.u.e) in Nothen Kenya with wildlife keepes Mike, Joseph, Naomi and May. They wee ecuited fom the Namunyak Wildlife Consevancy aea and have been especially successful at etuning lost elephant calves to thei family heds. Reteti is the fist community owned and managed sanctuay in Afica and the culmination of a two-decade shift towads community-diven consevation. Potecting animals fo, and not just fom, people is ceating new economies and conseving the full ecosystem. Please follow all of us, @amivitale, @r.e.s.c.u.e and @sararacamp to support and learn more about these initiatives. @nrt_kenya @lewa_wildlife @ConservationOrg @tusk_org @kenyawildlifeservice @sandiegozoo @natgeocreative @thephotosociety elephants saveelephants retetielephants stoppoaching kenya northernkenya magicalkenya whyilovekenya africa everydayafrica natureisspeaking photojournalism amivitale

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Video by @jtkerby | This gelada monkey mother is holding an infant that is only minutes old. Full photo sequence of its birth on my profile @jtkerby | Prior to photographing this story, I worked as a biologist in the Ethiopian Highlands. On this day, that training paid off when I noticed a female monkey acting oddly - she walked away from the herd on her own, not something adult females will often do. I had been following an Ethiopian wolf with fellow photographer @tbfrost, but quickly decided to figure out what this monkey was up to instead. It soon became apparent that she wasn't sick or hurt as I initially feared, but was about to give birth. I put on my telephoto lens, gave her some space, and watched her silently bring a new infant into the chilly alpine air. This video captures her moments after giving birth, just before a cool rain began to fall as she rejoined the herd. For more on geladas and the Guassa Community Conservation Area, check out @jtkerby and the full story in the April issue of NatGeo with additional photos by @tbfrost and text by @craigwelch. Ethiopia ExpeditionsCouncil Gelada Guassa GGRP

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photo by @martinschoeller Martin: "I love that hat." Larry: "That's my son's" M: "Pretty stylin'. Where are you from?" L: "Cincinnati, Ohio." M: "My wife is from Cleveland." L: "Oh, just up the road, that's nice." M: "Yeah. I don't mind Ohio. Everybody makes fun of it, but it's really pretty in the summer." L: "That's right." M: "You've been on the street for a while?" L: "About three months." M: "What happened?" L: "Well, what happened...my story is I was working as a nurse and what happened was I was afflicted with cancer. And it gets up to my kidneys. So at that point I had to drop everything I was doing. I'm on a machine Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. 5am in the morning for three hours, 'till 8:30am. And I get a needle in the stomach twice a week." M: "You don't need an operation or chemotherapy?" L: "This is chemo. It's a needle form. But this type of cancer is not extensive. You know what I mean?" M: "It won't spread?" L: "Yeah. They hit it before it got worse." M: "And then the chemo. Does it make you sick?" L: "No, no. I'm up and ready to go. I drink a cup of coffee and call it a day." M: "You're living and feeling good?" L: "Always. That's the key, right?" M: "How long did you work as a nurse?" L: "For twenty-one years." M: "Did you like it?" L: "I loved it. I liked the people, doing what I can, sharing, giving the little love that I can give, encouraging people to feel better and go forth, you can do better in your life and make it better, you know what I mean? Just live." For more portraits and stories, follow me: @martinschoeller

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Photograph by @PaulNicklen taken while on assignment for @natgeo in Antarctica // When penguin chicks head to sea for the first time, they are incredibly vulnerable as they lack the swimming skills of their parents. Leopard seals know they are weak and time their own migratory patterns to coincide with this mass exodus of chicks going to sea from the penguin colony. These Adelie chicks found themselves a moment of reprieve by hopping onto an iceberg. Then, it came down to a waiting game. As a bystander it is gut-wrenching to watch the drama unfold. The leopard seals need to eat and yet you hope for the penguins to make it out of ‘leopard seal alley’. To see the hard reality of a leopard seal eating a penguin, please followme on @paulnicklen // With @sea_legacy @natgeopristineseas @cristinamittermeier @ladzinski @andy_mann @craigwelch rhythmsofnature hardreality nature naturelovers instagood love picoftheday photooftheday adventure

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Image by @joelsartore | Three-month-old endangered red panda twins at the @LincolnChildrensZoo in Nebraska. Red pandas clean their fur in the mornings by licking their paws and then rubbing their fur with them, much like a cat would. They rub the parts they can’t reach, like their back, on rocks or trees. These animals are very temperature sensitive. When it’s hot out they often hang out on tree branches, dangling their limbs. When it gets cold they warm themselves by covering their faces with their huge, fluffy tails. If scared or threatened, red pandas first attempt to flee. If they can’t get away, they stand up on their hind legs, try to make themselves look larger, and use their sharp claws as defense. We’re happy to announce the release of our children’s photo/poetry book “Animal Ark” featuring images of over 100 species photographed by @joelsartore for the Photo Ark project and poetry by @kwamealexander. Through this book we learn how each of us, no matter how big or small, is important, miraculous, and vital to this planet. To see an image of a nine-week-old clouded leopard cub which is featured alongside these red pandas in our new children’s book, check out @joelsartore! . . babyanimals redpanda cuteanimals photoark animalark animalfacts natgeo

2 Days ago

National Geographic

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2 Days ago

National Geographic

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Video of sequenced photographs by @simonnorfolkstudio Avalanches are common in Afghanistan’s mountainous areas in winter, and rescue efforts are frequently hampered by a lack of equipment. Each year, this year no exception, the beautiful, pristine blanket of white holds within it the possibilities of destruction and death. Here another sequence of images from Bamyan Province in Afghanistan’s Central Highlands transitioning through seasons. From a frozen early spring through to the snows of winter, documenting the stages of flooding, irrigation, planting and harvest. Follow @simonnorfolkstudio for updates, outtakes, unpublished and archive material. Music: Ay Sholae Hazeen Desolate Flame used with permission. @instituteartist @michaelhoppengallery @benrubi_gallery @galleryluisotti @natgeo @thephotosociety afghanistan bamyan bamiyanlandscape photojournalism documentaryphotography simonnorfolkstudio simonnorfolk documentary reportage timelapse winter spring summer seasons prixpictet changingseasons snow video stratographs stratograph timetaken videooftheday landscape disasterseason

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Comment from National Geographic:


my frame-a kodiak brown bear through the rangefinder the academy of natural sciences of drexel university, philadelphia, USA by David Chancellor @chancellordavid The Kodiak brown bear is the largest of the Alaskan brown bears. Its varied diet follows the season, for example, it grazes on plants in the summer and eats salmon and berries during the late summer to fall. Brown bears are a subgroup of the grizzly bear, but they are now only found in Alaska and isolated regions of northern Canada. They are rarely found in the lower 48 US states, but were once found as far south as Mexico and as far west as the Sierra Mountains. Brown bears are often said to be unpredictable, but attacks on humans are rare. The few reported attacks that there are, however, are made by injured bears or females protecting or separated from their cubs. Brown bears are generally solitary creatures with no natural predators. To see more of my work and projects for @natgeo follow me here , and @chancellordavid diorama kodiakisland kodiakbear conserving hunting conservation academyofnaturalsciencesatdrexel @artfuldodgersimaging @hellokiosk @francescamaffeogallery mamiya7ii @filmsnotdead bears @natgeo @chancellordavid

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Comment from National Geographic:


Photograph by @thomaspeschak Charles Darwin called marine iguanas 'Imps of Darkness' and was not a fan of these, as he called them 'disgusting and clumsy' lizards. I on the other hand became completely smitten with these underwater algae munching Godzilla impersonators. They quickly became my favorite underwater photo subject. Dependent exclusively on cold water marine algae, increases in sea temperature have detrimental effects on marine iguana populations. If temperatures continuo to warm, these Galapagos icons could become the first to disappear. Shot on assignment for @natgeo magazine for a forthcoming story on Climate Change and the Galápagos Islands. In collaboration with @darwinfound galapagosnationalpark @pelayosalinas and @ecuadortravel For more images you can follow photographer @thomaspeschak

2 Days ago

National Geographic

@natgeo


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Comment from National Geographic:


Photo by @CristinaMittermeier. During a dive under the freezing waters of the Antarctic Peninsula, we came upon a tragic sight. A giant graveyard of blue whale skeletons; remnants of the slaughter that occurred here over 100 years ago. Complete skeletons of these giant whales still lie untouched in the bottom of the sea. Pre-whaling, there may have been more than 250,000 blue whales in the world. But relentlessly pursued by 20th century whaling fleets, the species was nearly exterminated before receiving worldwide protection in 1967. They are starting to recover in some parts of the world but remain absent from Antarctica. A reminder of how fragile, our marine ecosystems are. OnAssignment for @NatGeo. With @NatGeoPristineSeas, @paulnicklen, @andy_mann, @Ladzinski, @craigwelch. * * * To see images from this assignment, followme at @CristinaMittermeier banwhaling stopclimatechange nature respectnature underwater whale ocean PhotographersforAntarctica MPA CCAMLR2018

2 Days ago